Apathy = Frito Bandito Barf Bag Poem #16

Apathy = Frito Bandito
Barf Bag Poem #16

It’s not just what we’ve done that’s appalling,
it’s why we did it that sickens me. Is there
a new Armageddon club? Should “wage slave
barons” be added to our legal tender? We’ve
ruined Argentina’s economy to protect J.P
Morgan and friends, sink borrowed billions into
oil wars, and snicker when it’s China’s money
paying for a war that ends up controlling their
energy! The twisted fucks at the top figure that
if the war comes here, they’ll scoot over to Europe
or New Zealand to keep up with how their home
properties are doing on the news. Which fails first,
environment or oil? If population swells will Monsanto
de-crop the third world? Is everyone trapped by the
spell of money? Where is the outrage? Where have
all the protests gone, long time passing? You never
could vote bankers out, but the green counterpunch
has not materialized and our failure may well mean
the end of the world. Drat. Blast. Damn!

Copyright, Doug Stuber, 2006. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given, and with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Weehiya, Segment 4

This poetry book in English and Korean by Doug Stuber, contains works from 1973 until 2008. The book was published in 2010 by Chonnam University Press in Gwangju, South Korea. Weehiya (better spelled Weehiyeu) means “To Your Health” in Korean and is a typical toast.  Selected poems from:  The Blue Book (1983); Three Gainesville Poets (1985,Rebuts Trout Publications); More Poems (1991); Sex, Religion, Politics (1998,Hurt Branch & Carr); Rants and Raves (2003, Katherine James Books); Korea and Beyond (2007,Katherine James Books) and selected poems from 2008.  Translated by Park Yeon Seong, Jeong Kang Hee,Go Mi Ran, and Kim Soon.

May 18th Memorial drama Gwangju, South Korea #2

A commemoration of the fallen anti-dictator protesters in Gwangju happens every year on May 18th, the day in 1980 when hundreds died and many many more were wounded. South Korea finally earned a direct vote democracy in 1987. It took many more deaths for this change to take place…notably, 54 Seoul National University students, at separate times, made pro-democracy fliers and threw them off the bell tower at the school’s library. Then they threw themselves off, thus dying for the cause.

Note, on June 4, 1989 students in Beijing attempted to protest their way into a democracy, and lost. The “Tienanmen Square Massacre” resulted in many deaths, many imprisonments, and a squelching of democracy in China.

LESS THAN TWO WEEKS LATER, the George H.W. Bush administration gave China “most Favored Nation” trading status as…what?…a way of saying they can do business with dictators most assuredly pro USA, and NOT WITH democracies under which voters might vote in a non pro-USA government.

Many would argue that 1980 was also the turning point for American democracy, and that by 2000 it was lost forever.

What a shame.

Lee Dang Guem and dancer at the 518 Memorial old cemetary

A commemoration of the fallen anti-dictator protesters in Gwangju happens every year on May 18th, the day in 1980 when hundreds died and many many more were wounded. South Korea finally earned a direct vote democracy in 1987. It took many more deaths for this change to take place…notably, 54 Seoul National University students, at separate times, made pro-democracy fliers and threw them off the bell tower at the school’s library. Then they threw themselves off, thus dying for the cause.

Note, on June 4, 1989 students in Beijing attempted to protest their way into a democracy, and lost. The “Tienanmen Square Massacre” resulted in many deaths, many imprisonments, and a squelching of democracy in China.

LESS THAN TWO WEEKS LATER, the George H.W. Bush administration gave China “most Favored Nation” trading status as…what?…a way of saying they can do business with dictators most assuredly pro USA, and NOT WITH democracies under which voters might vote in a non pro-USA government.

Many would argue that 1980 was also the turning point for American democracy, and that by 2000 it was lost forever.

What a shame.

Weehiya, Segment 2

Video poetry reading.

This poetry book in English and Korean by Doug Stuber, contains works form 1973 until 2008. The book was published in 2010 by Chonnam University Press in Gwangju, South Korea. Weehiya (better spelled Weehiyeu) means “To Your Health” in Korean and is a typical toast.  Selected poems from:  The Blue Book (1983); Three Gainesville Poets (1985,Rebuts Trout Publications); More Poems (1991); Sex, Religion, Politics (1998,Hurt Branch & Carr); Rants and Raves (2003, Katherine James Books); Korea and Beyond (2007,Katherine James Books) and selected poems from 2008.  Translated by Park Yeon Seong, Jeong Kang Hee,Go Mi Ran, and Kim Soon

Found at Tony’s

Found at Tony’s

The goliath head walks sharp edges between
love and duty. The last innocent man confronts
killer angels with a “gift” from Washington, D.C.
At swim, two boys chat about how to get what
you want and want what you have. A scavenger
hunts Darwin’s children; a pale horse coming in
a blue angel night with a spycatcher mounted
tries to save grave Maurice, but a river runs
through it, breaking the covenant with the
Corsican. The White House connection gives rise
to the night of the moonbow, causing the
charioteer to commit the fourth deadly sin. Father:
unknown screams “don’t kill me,” catches the
bayou train on blind faith, knowing childhood’s
end awaits at the morning gate. A double coffin
opens to a Kentucky surprise, no place to come to,
as the murder in the house was the final target.
This reunion in death lasts a split second, as
an old school tie is not strong enough to battle
the footprints of God. Blood and rubles, the enemy
within, triple the agony from Alaska to the Caribbean,
now a cold paradise for Horowitz, the Chess teacher.

Copyright, Doug Stuber, 2005. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given, and with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Weehiya, Segment 1

This poetry book in English and Korean by Doug Stuber, contains works form 1973 until 2008. The book was published in 2010 by Chonnam University Press in Gwangju, South Korea. Weehiya (better spelled Weehiyeu) means “To Your Health” in Korean and is a typical toast.  Selected poems from:  The Blue Book (1983); Three Gainesville Poets (1985,Rebuts Trout Publications); More Poems (1991); Sex, Religion, Politics (1998,Hurt Branch & Carr); Rants and Raves (2003, Katherine James Books); Korea and Beyond (2007,Katherine James Books) and selected poems from 2008.  Translated by Park Yeon Seong, Jeong Kang Hee,Go Mi Ran, and Kim Soon.

Dance the Lindy

Dance the Lindy

Eastern flatlanders with dainty feet stroll
carefully on crooked bricks laid long ago,
when hard labor was the only way. Touristas
mingle, pondering a move, while a proud man,
now weary, takes his daily constitutional before
lying on bench number one, shaded, wooden
and home until the shelter opens at eight. Overhead,
beetles harmonize in oaks, barely curious. Human
activity warms past the sweating point, as the longest
ten-minute wait in your life climaxes with her arrival.

Now the jokes, nervous laughter, adolescent tension
soon to be released, one way or the other (six beers
or a mid-day romp). Slick thinking gets you nowhere
but this day is about hauling a friend back from the
deep pink-slip blues; the single-mom version.
So you’re gentle, happy, concerned, helpful, and
drinking beers. Two pagans entertain electricians
in booth number three. One announces that she just
got married, and that kills the moment, so its back
to cheeseburger and fries and pickle, lunch and you.

Copyright, Doug Stuber, 2005. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given, and with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Caterpillar

Caterpillar

Over fifty scraps lie scattered across from the mission
and Salvation Army in Raleigh’s Moore Square. A cop
on horseback does not pick up. A skinny man heads
west on Person, his shoulder bag is a red square around
a black square. The nautical flag for hurricanes comes to
mind, as Mrs. Miller’s fourth grade runs a Frisbee relay, ten
yards removed from the daily horrors of homelessness. Now
Norm, purple-shirted attendant, starts to sweep trash, dump
trash, and greet the park’s residents with a cheery “good morning.”
It’s 40 ounces, a Newport pack, toothpaste boxes, Styrofoam
cups. “It’s messier than usual today,” he gimps on his way to
another litter zone. Miller’s museum magnet kids are already
back inside when three empty school busses and an empty
trolley motor past. This reminds you of the sixty busses you saw
parked under water in New Orleans, and the white cops who
wouldn’t let black residents flee Katrina’s flood, and the
traumatic gait Norm still succumbs to while picking up trash,
and the four-year-old boy holding the bottle that feeds his baby
sister, and the sign at Denny’s offering a chance to contribute to
the hurricane fund, and the caterpillar currently crawling up your
leg, just needing a friend. You remove another caterpillar, the wind
gusts, and another man in purple walks through Oak’s mud, backpack
full to brimming, striding quickly, nowhere to go. Brown caterpillar returns
for a third visit. “What makes you so special?” you think, rising to leave.

Copyright, Doug Stuber, 2005. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given, and with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.