Edo Palace Mix

Edo Palace Mix

Takae, so simple, fluttering on the wind of vegetarian
existence, refusing to eat up more than her share,
presenting herself a second time, but finding no taker,
is less than joyous, yet remains so gentle. Two swans
glide, bobbing for minnows, mated for life, fed by ample
moat, seen by hundreds each day. Mostly Takae yearns
to be the swan on the right, head held up, pet of the palace.
Instead, like the sour gooseberry picker, Chekhov’s Nikolay,
she labors at city hall. Better, like the clerk job Kafka had, or
Poe’s daily grind, Takae, so full of wonder, but now resentment
too, as youth slips into middle age with no permanent necker,
glider, lover to snuggle with. Yellow petunias with purple eyes
stretch open to us, and I think that Takae will see this exact
pattern and find comfort having spent a day in Chiba
with friends that will, over time, form a second base.
A dream fulfilled erases previous disappointment. How to
meld dreams into the closeness that supports? Elephant ear
plants glisten under gray. Bamboo rustles, imperial reminder
that one generation can be the foundation of new style, culture,
love, beauty, art, strength, ethics, for centuries to come.

Can Korean, or any other Culture Avoid Being Homogenized via Globalization?

Saving Korean culture is going to be left in the hands of generations who spend an entire lunch on their smart phones. A lunch, mind you, at which three old friends have re-united after a long semester in universities spread all over the country.

If the attention spectrum of our youth is so fractured, and less and less sign up for drum troops, play traditional instruments, sing Pansori or Throt, or, importantly, paint, write or dance in the old ways, the old ways will disappear.

Korea has long been occupied: by China, Mongolia, China, Japan and now the USA. Even though many households, especially in Joellanamdo still stick to Confucian rules, the attraction of the occupiers cannot be denied. We still name our children using Chinese characters, wear Hanboks at weddings, eat rice cake cookies and Kimchi; but the current overthrow of Korean culture may be complete.

Here’s why: other than initial wars, one culture can be overthrown via language, religions and, alarmingly, popular culture.

Remember the brave folk singers who helped topple dictators here? The same type minstrels also helped end the Vietnam War in the USA. Where are they now? They’ve been shut out of contracts and replaced by KPOP, and overtly sexual form of song and dance that repeats both disco (USA 1970s) and the boy bands of the 80s and 90s, like New Kids on the Block and ‘N’ Synch. Lyrics such as “Baby One More Time,” or “Mister Mister” are not giving Korea a wholesome reputation around the world. Even Gangnam Style was full of meanings formerly considered vulgar in Korea.

This is not a matter of old fashion or conservative values, but a plea for people to think about how many other cultures have been lost via globalization, genocide, slavery, greed. Of all the cultures to copy, the USA does not come to mind as a particularly wise choice. The country has invaded other countries 90 times since World War II. Its education and health care systems are, except at universities, abominable, or they cost more than most can afford. Private hospitals have already crept into the Korean system.

There are many examples of creative and performing artists keeping traditional Korean ways alive, but the youth of Korea is headed in another direction. As sure as the Ajummas one day will stop showing up on streets or in traditional markets, taking on American ideals will lead to higher crime rates, a wider gap between rich and poor, and a greater dependency on globalized trade, rather than being self sufficient. Such dependencies assure the further erosion of Korean culture in favor of “world culture” meaning US values.

Music and movies, along with TV occupy the brain cells with “entertainment” that makes people numb with vapid content. Add to this Text Messaging and PC Games, and Korea’s lost generation is already 40 years old!

English, for the broad majority of workers, is not necessary. President Park Gun Hye took it off the KSAT university exam. It’s a start, but maybe too little, too late. I believe foreign language education is vital for brain development, as is music. But, by adopting the USA’s language, culture (note Kim Ki Duk’ movies) and horrifying religions, Korea’s past and future contributions to world culture are and will be collaborations, at best.

Catholic missionaries and others have been in Korea since long before the War of North and South. They have, along with capitalism, changed Korea from a culture in which everyone shared and knew each other, into a “my dogma is better than your dogma” religious Olympics. This, above all, threatens Buddhism. Koreans may be skeptical of Buddhism, but its core values are more peace loving and aware of the environment than Christians have ever been (Quakers excepted).

Here, only the most conservative flocks such as Seventh Day Adventist (SDA) Jehova’s Witness, and right-winged Presbyterians (huh?) and others represent a real threat. The SDA offers people jobs in the food industry in trade for piety. Do we need such a radical church controlling our food supply or educating our children? This portends a robot culture akin to Pyeung Yang’s.

Almost every war since 800AD has been started by Christians, including the 3000 cultures wiped out via genocide in South and North America. Note “12 Years a Slave,” the 2014 Oscar winner for best movie, in which Christian teachings are preached to slaves that are kept in line with bullwhips and hangings.

No other religion inspires hypocrisy so completely. President Bush had to switch from Methodist to Baptist in order to keep his head up in Church, when the Methodists condemned his wars. He was the first sitting President to switch religions in US history. He kept going while his policies including killing innocent civilians and torture. President Lee Myung Bak kept going to Presbyterian church though eight protesters died at the wrong end of his water cannons, trying to keep very old us Beef out of Korea.

Good luck Korea, invaded in so many ways. Sharing and loving have been traded for big money and plastic surgery. Korean women no longer will marry a farmer or fisherman or wonderful man, unless they have money. This is dreadful.