Why Vote for Bernie? (1)

Please enjoy this brief video shot in my art studio (#131) at Golden Belt, Durham NC.

 

 

 

Dig the numbers!  Very strong stuff below

This is What Will Happen at the Democratic Convention

 

This is What Will Happen at the Democratic Convention

 

better math image

Can Sanders do it? Or is Clinton truly inevitable?

Math vs. Media: Part One

Bernie Sanders has vowed to fight relentlessly for the 2016 Democratic Party’s nomination up to the convention and, despite the apparent consensus of the media’s talking heads that the campaign is a lost cause, he has held fast to his claim that there is a “narrow path to victory.” I am reminded of Galadriel’s ominous words of advice, in the Fellowship of the Ring: The quest stands upon the edge of a knife — stray but a little, and it will fail…

It has even become something of a weekly occurrence for Hillary Clinton and her Wallstreet-backed campaign to imply, insinuate, or flat-out demand that Sanders withdraw his bid for the nomination — they are growing increasingly indignant about the fact that Sanders is trying to win. Which brings us to the heart of the issue — can Bernie Sanders–can we–win the delegates needed for the nomination?

The answer to this question is as simple as it is misleading — No. No, my friends, we cannot. And yet–! And yet, neither can Hillary Clinton — and I am going to show you what the media is willfully hiding from you. I am going to show you why, using the one thing that even the media can’t hide: Math.

Why Clinton Will Not Secure the Nomination, According to Math

According to the Green Papers, Clinton stands (today, April 28th) with 1,664 pledged delegates, while Sanders has gathered 1,371. The amount of delegates needed to secure the nomination is 2,383 and, if you’ll pardon me for my use of arithmetic, I will now demonstrate why that number is hopelessly out of reach for the Clinton campaign.†

Hillary needs 719 more delegates to reach 2,383 because:

2,383 – 1,664 = 719

Now, the pledged delegates that are available to grab in the remaining states all-together amount to 1,016 and in order to attain that blessed number, Clinton will have to win an average of 70.7% of the remaining states. This is because:

719 ÷ 1,016 = 0.707677 or approximately 71%

You might be thinking that 71% is not such an unattainable number for Hillary and her powerful Wallstreet backers — you might be thinking that but you’d be betting against longer odds than would be wise. You see, of the 1,016 delegates remaining, 475 of those delegates are to be won in California, alone — California, which has a semi-open primary. California, where Clinton is polling at a mere 49%. California, where Clinton’s support has been declining as the Sanders Campaign gains visibility and momentum. California — the ace that Sanders, as much as the media, have concealed up his sleeve.

It is no secret that Sanders, a previously invisible independent senator from the tiny state of Vermont, consistently climbs in the polls as he begins to campaign in the weeks before each state has had its primary. You don’t have to take my word for it — check the poll-histories for yourself or read this.

Because Bernie Sanders performs at his absolute best in open primaries and because he consistently rises in the polls, while Clinton consistently falls, it is extremely unlikely that Clinton will perform better than 49 points, let alone win the contest. Let’s do some more math:

Of the 475 delegates available in California on June 7th, lets say Hillary takes 49% of those (even though she will almost certainly take less). That would give her 232.75 delegates, which we’ll round up to an even 234.

475 x 0.49 = 232.75

Next, let’s add that to her current total of 1,664, bringing her up to 1,897. Now, she needs an additional 486 delegates to reach the magic number of 2,383, right? Let’s find out how many delegates Clinton would have to win in the remaining states (besides California, of course).

Of the 541 delegates left, once the 475 CA delegates have been subtracted from the 1,016 delegate total, Clinton is going to have to win almost 90% of the remaining non-California delegates! This is because, when you divide the number of delegates that Clinton needs after California by the number of delegates remaining after California, you get 0.898 or 89%, rounded down:

486 ÷ 541 = 0.898 or 89.8%

Now, how likely does that sound? It’s not likely in Oregon, a fairly progressive state that shares its general attitudes with Washington, a state that Sanders won with about 70% of the vote. It’s not likely in West Virginia, either, where Sanders is currently leading in the polls. Nor is it likely in Indiana where Sanders and Clinton are almost neck-and-neck, which votes on May 3rd. That nomination is feeling a lot further away now, isn’t it?

Okay, okay — maybe you’re thinking, “John, I think you’re being unfair, Clinton could certainly win California.” To which I would reply: I admire your optimism, my friend — and since you’re so optimistic, let’s run those numbers again — but this time, let’s assume that Clinton, for whatever reason, defies the consistent trends that have prevailed over the entire primary season. Let’s say, she jumps up 11% now, winning the California primary with 60% of the vote. So:

475 x 0.6 = 285

Now, add the 285 delegates to Clinton’s current total:

285 + 1,664 = 1,949

But:

2,383 – 1,949 = 434

So, Clinton will still need to scrape up 434 delegates somewhere other than California, some how. Which means — Hold on, first we have to figure out how much of the remaining delegates she’ll have to win:

434 ÷ 541 = .802218 or 80%

Wow! Even if Clinton actually wins California with 60% to Sanders with 40%, she will still have to secure about 80% of the remaining vote! Again, this certainly doesn’t seem likely in Oregon, West Virginia, or Indiana, which means the actual percentage would climb each time she failed to take 80% of a state! Now, are you starting to see why I am saying that Clinton will not be securing the nomination before the convention?

Why Sanders Will Win, According to Math

If you’ve found yourself thinking, “Well, Sanders won’t secure the nomination, either!” You are almost 100% right! Well, 99.6% right, anyway. Because, if we take Sanders’ current delegate total of 1,371, subtract that from the magic 2,383, then divide that by the remaining available delegates, we get 0.996, see:

2,383 – 1,371 = 1,012

1,012 ÷ 1,016 = 0.996 or 99.6%

Therefore, Sanders would have to secure a whopping 99.6% victory in all remaining states to secure the nomination! I think this may be one of the few things that both Berners and Clintonistas could agree on: that that is impossible. But to those of you that are thinking, “John! This is terrible” or “Haha! Take that, Sanders!” I would reply: You are both wrong. Mostly. Let me explain:

First off, let’s acknowledge that the math seems to prohibit both candidates from securing the nomination before the convention — so what does this mean? This means that, since Sanders will not give up before the convention, there will almost certainly be a “contested convention.”

“Um… But John…” you may be saying, “Won’t Hillary still be miles ahead of Sanders in votes at the convention?”

To which I would reply: I’m glad you asked, my paid Hillary-supporter friend! Allow me to demonstrate how that will also not be the case, no matter what the media would have you believe. Follow me!

Since neither of them will be securing the 2,383 needed for the nomination, let’s take a look at another number that has been hiding in plain sight for far too long. I’d like you to meet the number, 4,051. That’s the number of total pledged delegates that are available from all 50 states, plus DC, US territories, and the Democrats abroad. As it should be obvious, a majority of these delegates would be 2,026 because:

4,051 ÷ 2 = 2,025.5

At the convention, this number is going to matter more than the unattainable 2,383 delegates that no one will have. That being the case, let’s take a look at what Bernie Sanders would have to do to get there. If Sanders won 60% of the remaining contests (and remember how 475 of 1,016 are in California, where Sanders will do well), then the numbers at the convention would look like this:

1,016 x .60 = 609.6

Round that to 610 and add it to Sanders current total of 1,371, then divide that by the total delegate count, 4,051:

610 + 1,371 = 1,981

1,981 ÷ 4,051 = .489 or 48.9%

So, in the scenario where Sanders takes about 60% of the remaining vote, we’re essentially looking at a 49 to 51% vote total at the convention — not so bad, eh? And that’s easily within Sanders’ reach, if we do well in California (which we almost certainly will). Let’s look at what happens if he takes 70% (just like he did last time we went to the West/Left Coast):

1,016 x .70 = 711.2, round it down to 711, then:

711 + 1,371 = 2,082

2,082 ÷ 4,051 = 0.513 or 51.3%

If Sanders took 70%, the convention would look like 51.3 to 48.7%, in favor of Sanders! But 70%, while possible, is a bit of a stretch — the new magic number, for Sanders anyway, is actually 64.4% of the remaining states, which would mean winning 655 of the 1,016 remaining delegates, pushing his total up to 2,026, the bare majority of delegates, leaving Clinton one delegate behind at 2,025.

Now, does Sanders winning 64.4% sound too far-fetched? Not particularly, especially when we consider his advantages on the Left Coast, in California’s 475 delegate semi-open primary. An uphill climb, though? Certainly. Remember, though: it is all but certain that Clinton will not secure the nomination, while Sanders supporters are going to be pouring into Philadelphia for the convention by the tens of thousands. Even if Bernie fell short by a few points, we’re still essentially looking at a tie. And that’s when all hell is going to break loose.

Things are going to become very interesting if we have a near-tie at the convention to be decided by the super-delegates.

Things are going to become very interesting when they look back at the many states that are still crying out for a re-vote, states fraught with “voting irregularities,” polling station closures, and voter roll purges — all states which Clinton won and all states which so far have not received justice.

Things are going to become very interesting when the DNC and the super-delegates realize that Sanders, unlike the Wallstreet-backed Clinton-Machine, will bring in not only millions of independent voters that were unable to vote in the primaries, but even defecting Republican votes, sealing the GOP’s utter defeat in November.

Things are going to become very interesting when, while they are thinking about all of these things, they are doing so to the earth-shaking, thunderous chants of“Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” from his tens of thousands of supporters outside, who have time-and-again proven their ability to rally by the tens of thousands — do you think that we won’t do the same at the convention?

And finally, things are going to become very, very interesting when the super-delegates and the DNC are forced to choose, publicly, whether to hand the nomination to Clinton and watch the millions of independents walk away, along with millions of former-democrat Sanders-supporters, basically handing the general election to the neo-fascists Trump or Cruz — or, to hand it to Sanders, a leader who will have the support, not only of the entire Democratic Party, but of millions of Independents, Green Party voters, and — yes, indeed — even Republicans defecting from the extremist GOP. That will be the most interesting part, I think. I’ll see you all in Philadelphia.

In Solidarity,
John Laurits

P.S. Please feel totally free to reproduce this article, re-post, re-use, re-cycle, or whatever, in whole or in part — credit would be lovely but, ultimately, I don’t really care! Do as ye will! Peace!

#SeeYouInPhilly

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/follow_button.5e2061bafc51180fc22440a98a3560bf.en.html#dnt=false&id=twitter-widget-0&lang=en&screen_name=JohnLaurits&show_count=false&show_screen_name=true&size=m&time=1462888792714EDIT: I’ve written a follow-up article to address some of the comments because I don’t have enough time to respond to them all — thanks for reading! CLICK FOR PART TWO

EDIT #2: For the updated math, CLICK FOR “INDIANA: THE AFTER-MATH”

†I have not counted the so-called “super-delegates” because they do not vote until the convention, which you might not know because of the media’s disgustingly corrupt attempt to warp the public’s perception of the election.

*All numbers pulled from the Green Papers, today 4/28/2016, at:http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P16/D-PU.phtml

**Also, John has just joined Twitter (finally) and you may follow him and send him pictures of your dinner and crappy mainstream media math to debunk @JohnLaurits. You can buy John coffee here.

Song #3:Before my time,but still.

I sat in a creative writing class at Hollins and listened to a fellow MFA student explain why this song was the sexiest song of all time. I disagreed at the time, but have reconsidered, and find it to be a very romantic piece.

What better way to celebrate Christmas, or the entire new year, than with exactly the one of your choice, and alone as a twosome?

Merry Christmas + a Song #2

Merry Christmas everyone.  Travelling to be with family, so a bit spotty lately.

There’s nothing like music to help jog the memory of great friends.

Here’s one that reminds me of my brother.  It’s been 14 years my best friend Tad.  Still you dance in my heart, drum for my band, keep me in line.

Thanks for the memories Bro.

 

Barry, Chapter One, Part XXVII

part 27

 

With this Lisa looked at me, and without even having to put an upward-angled nod on her head, I knew her idea was to have us three boys boat home right away, even if it was 4am.

Me:  I’m fine without a sleeping bag, I’ll just crash over here on this side of the tent.

Lisa: Isn’t it better if you take your friends home . Your parents will be missing you.

Me:  I doubt that.  After a deep alcoholic sleep they will wake up and see the boat gone and figure out we’re out messing around on the lake somewhere.

Lisa:  You mean they don’t know you came down here at midnight?

Me:  Your mom knew, but otherwise, except for longer lines at the bar, I bet no one noticed.

Lisa: Then that’s worse.

Me:  Oh? But your parents have already come home, and they never even bothered ot look in on us.  If your mom was worried about what we were doing, don’t you think she would have come up to say hello?

Lisa:   Maybe.

Me: Well, either we have parental approval, or the other guys are asleep already, or both.  It’s more dangerous to try to get home in the dark than in daylight. I haven’t heard any of the girls scream, so it appears everything is under control, right?

Lisa:  I guess so Barry; you sure have a gift for persuasion.

Barry, Chapter One, Part XIX

They screamed, then one said “who are you, go away, this is private property.”

            “Is that you Lisa?” I asked.  “Your mother sent us down here from my parent’s party.”

            “Get out of here, she did not,” Lisa belched as she said.

            “It’s Barry, I’ve seen your dad out at the jazz club, we’re just out late to have fun, we’re not criminals.

            “Let me take a look at you,” Lisa said, as she unzipped a six-man tent, her flashlight ablaze.  “Oh bit’s you three, I see.  Well then, why exactly would your parents let you drive a boat so far at night? And why would my mom send you down here to ruin our slumber party?”
 Never shy around  women, Thomas spoke the truth: “she sent us down on a panty raid..”

            “OK, that’s it, get out of here!”

            “But wait,” Jerry protested, that’s exactly what she said, but that doesn’t mean that is what we came down here to do.”

Barry Chapter One, Part XVIII

What the hell Barry, it could be any of these places,” Jerry chirped in the cool night air.  Canandaigua’s water only gets to about 67 degrees in a good August, so at night, the lake cools the air.

            “But I know their dock is square and they have a boathouse with a bedroom over it for guests.  Sure enough this place fits that, and I know I’m right.”

            “I hope, Thomas said in testosterese. “Throw me a line,” which he tied to a dock post in a hasty but accurate bowline.

            “OK boys, here we go, but if this is the wrong house, we just turn and run, right?”Jerry asked.

            “Right.”

            As soon as we got up the steps I knew I had gotten lucky because I recognized the compound which included two wooden houses carved out of a hill that led up to the tennis court.

            “You can hear them up there,” I said, pointing to the tennis court. At full pace we jogged up and Thomas yelled “We’re here ladies.”

Barry Chapter One, Part XVII

            “Well, “Cleo continued, “she’s having a sleep-over down the lake. “The girls have tents up behind the tennis court.  Why don’t you go down and have a panty raid,” she said, slightly tipsy, but matter-of-factly.

            The three of us, dumbstruck, looked at each other as if all our dreams had come true.

            Jerry “Thanks for the tip mum,” as if British, and we were off, out of there, sprinting 35 yards to the dock, firing up the inboard/outboard engine on a 16-foot Glastron, not checking the gas lever, nevermind that it was pitch black, I had only been to their house once, ,and I couldn’t remember whether it  was three or four points from Tichner’s Point  to (and beyond) Rochester Point.  Of course, Menteeth Point was first up as a landmark. But, at just around midnight, only points were a guide, and damn it, which came first Rochester or Seneca Point?  I knew Seneca was a much more dramatic outcropping, and guessed correctly that Rochester was before Seneca.  Even better, we didn’t run out of gas.

Barry, Chapter One, Part IX

A four mile walk is not bad for a 14-year-old, though I had been over 200 pounds since I was 10.  Between 19 and 29 I never felt fat, though hit 330 at one point.  At 29, a member of the International Peace Walk (we were trekking through Russia for peace) told me it was nice to “have a person of size” on the walk, and right then (15 years later) I felt fat; but no one noticed my size again for another 20 years (girlfriends and wives included) until I moved to Korea, where lookism and the horrible looks one gets if chubby are augmented by comments like this one:  I was sitting with a retired opera singer and her photographer husband in his restaurant “museum” in Damyang.  She was about 70 years old.  The very first thing she said to me was not “hello” or “Anyon Haseo,” but, “when are you going to lose your weight?” I informed her that I had lost over 23 kilos (that’s over 50 pounds) in the last five years (taking me down to near 240 pounds) and at that point I thought she was going to faint.

But I progress.

Art Plug and hello again

Hello to the dozens or so who may have missed adding my blog to their regular reading role the last few days.

For one, I was busy making book covers.  here they are!

http://creativeaction.network/collections/doug-stuber

Woman catches 300 pound jumping tuna

Woman catches 300 pound jumping tuna

The reason this one got named is that a very attractive woman from Savannah GA, or close to it, had just caught a 300 pound tuna when she wandered into a salad shop (SALADELIA, Durham, NC) and simply “had” to buy this painting.  That was about a decade ago.

It originally hung with the left side as the top, but a keep eye spotted more narrative in this format, and so a painting was born, via re-hanging in another direction.

Isn’t that a great story?  it’s another example of how extreme synchronicity works its magic in our lives.  but it only works to your advantage if you are open to change, and spontaneous.

Now, how’s that for a story?

Note the chops on Stewart Copeland’s drumming.  Short blasts of fills that amaze and dazzle.

Birthday Eve: Three amazing women, one synchronous moment in 1991

DSC_0004

Thistles.  The natural wonder of Scotland.

Here’s a quick story.  I was in love with a woman for at least 11 years who was born on the Scorpio/Libra cusp known as October 22.  She is #2 in this sequence.Before her I was in love with another amazing woman for four years, but made the error of going out to caddy on the LPGA Tour.  Well maybe it worked out for everyone on that one.  In between and continuing as a friendship beyond until now, I met a Russian woman on the International Peace Walk in 1987 in Russia and again in 1989 here in the USA in Philadelphia.

In 1991 the Russian lady visited us in Gainesville, Florida.  I was with Woman #2 then.

The three of us went to the Oaks Mall, and voila lady #1 was shopping there by luck.

All four of us sat (I bet I was the most uncomfortable) for an hour or so chatting, and what makes this story interesting to anyone else is this:

All three were born on October 22.

Wow.

It’s a super significant day for me.  Anyone else out there have such an amazing coincidental day in their lives?

peace,

out,

Doug

Liebster Award: a conversation starter and major ego boost?

I was nominated for a Liebster…again!  Wow this is so amazing.

Drop to the bottom of this blog to see if you were nominated by me.

erospea.wordpress.com  aka Spaginazioni Poetiche aka Dora

is the beautiful woman who nominated me.

The Liebster logo looks like this:

untitled

her questions to me are these:

My questions to nominees (plus Doug’s answers):

  1. What is your view on ‘”intercultural”?

If everyone were intercultural and studied more about each other’s cultures, the world would have a chance of being more peaceful IF, and it’s giant IF, those in control at the top actually gave a hoot about how those regular folks feel. Sadly, there is always an excuse for war, at least in the minds of those representing war profits in their jobs as professional elected officials.  Thus in many governments, but most importantly the big powerful ones (See USA, China, Russia, Japan, and Saudi Arabia first) those making decisions are fully owned subsidiaries of big corporate business.  Democracy cannot, or has not, been able to change this.

2) If I say “gestural language”?

Then I think body language, and at the precise moment someone else is falling in love with you they will say it with their body (their eyes, reaching a hand toward you, etc.) first, mouth and words second.  OK maybe even mouth before words if the attraction is strong enough.  Gestural language is more than ballet or giving someone the finger then, by a long shot.  You can really commune with wild animals if both you and the critter believe in gestures.
3)  Your own reflection on the “nomadism”

I have lived in 16 cities since I was 16 years old.  All of my own volition except two.  Traveling and WORKING in other cultures is a great way to live a full life.  I want to know how Ms. or mister “Jo/Joe on the street” sees the world, what influences them, and why.  Tourist, no.  Live there for a year+, yes.
4) Tell me something about your culture of belonging

My culture is a violent, yet caring, warmongering, yet peace donating, hate yet love kinda place.  Some of the great benefactors of the world came from the USA, after they made money by underpaying workers and raping the environment.  Such potential, often wasted on spending zillions on foreign wars.
5) What is your thought on “religion”?

I think spirituality is worth seeking out and getting better at.  it’s nice to try to commune with “the Creator,” but most religions falter when fundamentalists take over.  Hence, “which is worse, a fundamentalist Christian or a fundamentalist Muslim?”  Answer:  they are equally despicable, and are leading their legions down the path to continual war…not a path found in the books of either religion.  Dang war hounds.


6) If I tell you “childhood”?

Childhood is to be supported and encouraged throughout everyone’s lives.  Especially the lives of children.  Education is important, but so is walking around and learning things from nature on your own.  It’s hard to be functioning at a high level if your parents did all the chores for you so you could study or practice music ONLY.  If we allow our children some time to learn about how things work THEMSELVES, they will be able to learn anything they put their minds too.  Keep them away from electronics and out in the field.


7) Do you have a dream?

My dream is that one day my art or music actually is recognized by someone other than myself.  To that extent, even when I was playing music in bar bands, there have ALWAYS been people who supported my creativity.  That’s the miracle you have to believe in to keep going.  You won’t always get in the New Yorker or the Whitney Biennale, but if someone ever asks for a copy of the poem you just read, or buys or accepts as a gift your art, or cheers for the song you just played, dance you just danced, speech you delivered with panache…then soak it in and keep it rolling.  Teaching is like a continual boost of your ideas, if in the right school.  My dream is to sit at a simple meal or tea and talk to people I agree with: learn something from those I disagree with.


8) What role do you think the “Art” can play in society in relation to the your local context and in a broader view?

Art, like anything, is in the eye of the beholder.  The world has thousands of protests artists, musicians, poets, novelists, but it depends who sees it, hears it, takes it in and is influenced by it.  In some cultures art is quite important, in others people make art almost in a vacuum.  In the end, the universe takes care of artists…I don’t know how, but it works.  As a society, any given culture would be wise to listen to its artists, to support them, as without creativity, many become a burden on society.  is it better to support an artists who only paints or sculpts or dances, and is dirt poor because they spend their whole lives with their craft, refusing to wait on tables?  or is it better to watch someone become dejected because THEY ARE NOT FOLLOWING THEIR DREAMS, and then commit a crime, or do harm to themselves?  Easy answer here:  support who you can in their dreams because that puts you on the path of realizing your own.


9) What is your idea about “sexuality”?

I think sex is great.  Those who deny it are missing out on God’s gift.  The Native Americans who walked my space in upstate New York years ago, were naturalists in their spirituality.  To them, at least as far as I know, making love was the highest homage to the Creator.  Easy to understand:  it’s because making love (at least the traditional forms of sex) meant that you were joining the Creator in the miracle of life (or at least a chance of making a new life) and thus, if you love, and love your life, and love your mate’s life, producing a child is a way of spreading the love.  The Creator surely smiles on love making.  If you and your mate can’t spread the love via making a baby, you ARE however spreading the love amongst yourselves, and helping your mate to be at peace in the world, and helping society by being in love and showing others how good your love is.  Thus, sexuality, when coupled with love, is just about the best thing you can do in private that helps the public good.  If lucky, you find a partner who loves sex as much and as often as you do.


10) There is a place where you love to go when you want to feel peace and well-being?

Outside.  In the Woods.  I used to paint outside, I still write outside.  I can also be in pure bliss at my sons’s baseball game, or being a part of a crowd at a rock concert.Specifically, Canandaigua, New York, the lake, the hills, the creeks. It’s usually not where I go, but with whom I go.

Doug & Jim

And here are my nominees.  If you don’t want to play along, that’s fine.

soulspeak2013.wordpress.com

poetella.wordpress.com

toastandteatogether.wordpress.com

cristianmihai.wordpress.com

meandthe30dayproject.wordpress.com

nikkiskies.wordpress.com

lijiun.wordpress.com

patcegan.wordpress.com

thoughtcatalog.wordpress.com

momentarylapseofsanity.wordpress.com

AND YOUR QUESTIONS

  1. Can better communication save the world?
  2. Are all cultures equal, just different?  Or are some cultures stronger/better/more reasonable than others, and why?
  3. Name a philosophy/philosopher you agree with and why
  4. Don’t think long:  What is your favorite movie?
  5. If you could give one 30 minute speech that would create universal harmony among humans, what would the title be?  Or, write us the whole speech.
  6. Did you ever fall in love at first sight?  If so, explain, if not, what are the parameters that need to fall into place in order for you to fall in love?
  7. Your favorite flavor of ice cream.
  8. The teacher you remember most from grades 1-8, and why
  9. What do you want your children or your friends to remember most about you?
  10. Is it possible to rise above expectations, both cultural and familial, and make a unique life that is a positive light? If you’ve done that or are in the process, let us know how.

Art Music Poetry #94

Cartoon face from fourth grade reviited

Cartoon face from fourth grade revisited

To Be Human

 

is to fall in love over and over,

to never give up on any of them,

to cry for the inhumanity, and try to

overcome all that surrounds us by creating

a closeness with those in proximity, both

geographical and philosophical.  It is to

carry those loves in our heart, flooding our

minds no matter how gone they are.  And

to put others’ needs first, understand their

flaws, work on our own so we can be

better helpers.  It is to take it all in and

follow our dreams no matter how preposterous;

to pull apart another brown paper bag and

to write it all out, no matter how choppy.

So take my hand and make it all better

before I repeat the painful parts until

I can no longer act.  To struggle past

obstructions and obligations, self imposed and

expected; to wallow in joy, build strength and

change what we can for the better. To live, to give.

Art Music Poetry #92

Opus 1700.Done at the Art Hotel Artist Colony, Kicevo, Macedonia, 2010,

Opus 1700.Done at the Art Hotel Artist Colony, Kicevo, Macedonia, 2010,

We’ve woven a web, you and I,
attached to the world, for no matter
how long, inscribed, though poorly, for
scant eyes, still, as bright a love aura as
has ever glowed, tightly wound around
our hearts, yet soaring miles above
Moodeung’s fog to warm cold February.
Sparks fly off a round-rock fire rarely seen
in these parts. We laugh, it feels like we
shouldn’t be here on a cold winter night,
just a few meters from trails so packed
during the day. This charge will never
leave. We’ve marked this space but must
go to where the stars shine, deer run, art springs.
Keep my heart in your brain, words in your hair.
Matched lifelong yearning bursts in my hand,
fluorescent. Quick, pack what you need, let’s
flee! live life in the positive zone, expand
what we enjoy together, bound by the luck
that brought us this far. Where to next?

Art Music Poetry #85, featuring a brand new poem

Opus 1494, 2006

Opus 1494, 2006

To Be Human

 

is to fall in love over and over,

to never give up on any of them,

to cry for the inhumanity, and try to

overcome all that surrounds us by creating

a closeness with those in proximity, both

geographical and philosophical.  It is to

carry those loves in our heart, flooding our

minds no matter how gone they are.  And

to put others’ needs first, understand their

flaws, work on our own so we can be

better helpers.  It is to take it all in and

follow our dreams no matter how preposterous;

to pull apart another brown paper bag and

to write it all out, no matter how choppy.

So take my hand and make it all better

before I repeat the painful parts until

I can no longer act.  To struggle past

obstructions and obligations, self imposed and

expected; to wallow in joy, build strength and

change what we can for the better. To live, to give.

Written August 28, 2015

Art Music Poetry #61

unusual one, isn't it?

             unusual one, isn’t it?

Great Expectations

Great expectations – great?

But what when the obvious happens?

A predictable animal grasps you

And throws you to the ground.

Thoughts of how nice it would be if . . .

Then they vanish like a dream when you wake up.

A floating reality teases your mind,

It is there but it may never reach you.

Dogwood

Outreaching leaves of white

Directly over green.

How can it seem trite,

This wonderful nature machine?

Later, as the summer grows

Those greens come into life.

Spreading all the charm they know

While stealing the dogwood’s white.